Health care policy and reform- this is what I am doing this AM

As I have said before, this blog is not just about the pain and grief of being a bereaved mother and suicide loss survivor, but it is also about sharing my thoughts on the research that I do as I go through finishing my BSN. I have been a practicing registered nurse since 2006 with an Associate’s Degree in Nursing, but after Oscar died I felt that the only way my voice would truly carry and give strength to my opinions regarding health care reform is if I had a Bachelor’s in Nursing. So, in Oscar’s memory, I started back to school the fall a year after he died and I am on track to finish after fall semester this year. It has been a long, hard road, especially now that I am newly grieving for the loss of Oscar’s dad, my ex-husband, Nick, also to suicide. Here is what all of my research and thought processes keep boiling down to: we need universal health care and a universal electronic medical record. Period, end of story. I wrote the following paper for my Public Health Nursing class this morning and I wanted to share.

 

The recent article I found is, “Rebounding with Medicare: Reform and Counterreform in American Health Policy,” by Paul Starr of Princeton University.  From my research on the topic of universal health care in the United States, it became clear that Mr. Starr has a strong voice on the matter with a history of several articles and books pertaining to the subject of health care reform in America.  Mr. Starr proposes that we have an opportunity to expand Medicare through a program he refers to as “Midlife Medicare” in response to the Trump administration’s recent setbacks on our progress to provide every one of our citizens with basic health care.

My personal experience as a suicide loss survivor and my professional experience as a registered nurse inform my passion for health care reform.  One thing has become clear to me as I grapple with the disabling pain of suicide loss- our health care system is the root cause of our ills.  And how extremely infuriating!  Here we are in one of the world’s richest countries and we cannot afford to provide universal health insurance for our citizens?  Mr. Starr analyzes the history of health care reform in the United States and notes that all important reform has been made on the rebound from the failure of more progressive proposals.  He acknowledges that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has had very limited success in fulfilling its goal of ensuring all American citizens have health insurance.  The ACA has been a downright failure in some respects.  It has forced the price of premiums up while not guaranteeing basic coverages to patients.  In other words, just because someone is insured doesn’t mean they can afford to get care, which does nothing to solve the problem of health care for all.

The devastation of not having health insurance or not having adequate health insurance is heart breaking.  There are so many stories to illustrate the social injustice that not having universal health care causes.  It seems that each of us has been directly affected or is only one person away from being directly affected.  The implications on nursing of universal health care are tremendous.  I believe that the positive effects of universal health care are all encompassing.  If we had universal health care, as a nurse and mother, I would have been able to get the care my oldest son needed without traumatizing him with mental health hospitalization.  I would have been able to guide my ex-husband to the care he needed so he could have received the care he required for the treatment of Crohn’s disease without worrying how he was going to pay for it.  I believe, deep in my heart and soul, that if I had been able to make those two interventions my family would still be complete.

I have thought a lot about how to help our citizens who die unjustly, and I am not just talking about suicide, I believe that many deaths in our society happen that could be prevented with adequate access to primary health care for prevention.  My thought processes always boil down to two issues: universal health care and a universal electronic medical record.  At the core of these ideas is patient safety.  Patient safety is the heart and soul of nursing.  I appreciate Mr. Starr’s work and am grateful I found him.  His suggestion of “Midlife Medicare” as a rebound reform to our health care system is right on target.  A positive step in exactly the right direction.

 

 

Starr, P. (2018). Rebounding with Medicare: Reform and Counterreform in American Health Policy. Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law,43(4), 707-730. doi:10.1215/03616878-6527996

 

 

 

 

daily grief

Even though I don’t talk about it as much as I used to, my grief still looms large. I really like the grief model with the idea that you learn to grow around your grief. I resonate with that fully. I feel that at first my grief was my entire existence. Slowly, ever so slowly, I started learning how to allow myself to feel other feelings alongside the grief. Over the past 3 years since Oscar died I have become so much bigger than I ever was before- energetically. I feel like my energetic footprint takes up at least twice as much space as it did before I began to grow around my grief.

Doesn’t change the fact that sometimes, some days, there will be some sort of catalyst event and I am moved straight to tears. My grief swallows my energy and I am in that darkness without. The sucking without-my-beautiful-boy darkness. I love Angela Miller (A bed for my heart) and how she speaks strongly about how, as a bereaved mama, you learn to mother not only your living children, but the ones who have died, as well. I deeply resonate with that truth. Every. day.

Yesterday, at lunch, in the middle of the employee lounge, I am eating my leftover hungry root (just started that meal delivery service and so far it has been an excellent experience- I’ve tried many and this one is my favorite) focused on staying balanced and focused with my Kangaroo totem energy and the green calcite in my pocket along with my doTerra Citrus Bliss mixed with Frankincense aromatherapy and I open Facebook. There is a memory from 6 years ago of my sweet sweet daughter, Vivian, and her pink kitchen. Her pink kitchen was her very favorite toy for about 3 years or so and when we moved from Washington to Kansas it was a very very big deal when it was finally shipped to us. It was about 6 months after she moved down here that she was reunited with it. Of course I took a picture of her with it as soon as it was unpacked! Well, there was a comment from her dad. Grief started rolling in. There was a like on the comment and I clicked to see who liked it. Oscar. The tears just started. Just like that. Thank God my dear friend, Emily, was sitting at the same table. I showed her what was up and she scooted close to me, gave me a big hug and I had a few seconds of sobbing. My grief overwhelmings don’t usually suck as much time out of my day as they used to, but only because I have learned how to breathe through them. I breathe through them, feel them and consciously shield them with my entire self. It has taken a tremendous amount of diligent spirit work to get to where I am in my relationship with my grief.

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Christmas 2018

Christmas sucks.

This is Christmas number four without Oscar and Christmas number one without Nick. There was no way I could bear the thought of being at home today, so a few weeks ago I did what Nick would have liked for me to do: book a room at Great Wolf Lodge. We have an incredible room! We got an upgrade, so I have my own room. So wonderful. I am so grateful to be able to do this for the kids and for me. But this is one of the conundrums of grief: feeling two opposite feelings equally as strongly at the same time. I am grateful for the now, spending this time with my kids and having a break from it all, but the pain of loss is especially poignant right now.

Christmas used to always be proceeded by a sleepless night for me and Nick when the Lane kids were all little. I remember Nick used to say, “Christmas should be a good time for us, we deserve to have one good time a year, Jes.” And so every year we would splurge on the kiddos. So many gifts! The tree would always be bursting and the stockings overflowing with all sorts of fun stuff. We went broke each year a little more at Christmas, but the smiles on the kids’ faces were so worth it. I didn’t know that then. The crushing debt was one of the issues that broke our marriage. There were lots of reasons we were dysfunctional and needed a divorce, don’t get me wrong, but the debt added a level of stress that was smothering.

This year, since Nick died, I have been struggling. Truly. Just to see what his death has done to our kids and to feel that heartbreak and also my own in a world that will. not. give. has been exceptionally exhausting. All of the same levels and types of emotion and pain as when Oscar died, but without any grace. None. The world shrugged it’s shoulders and laughed while saying, “let’s see how you make it through this one.” So many emotions. How do you stay focused on the good in a set of circumstances like that?

Lots of ways. I see Oscar everywhere, and this helps me. Sometimes it is unbelievably sad and painful, but mostly it makes me smile and fills my heart with warmth. I stay connected spiritually by taking care of myself. Aromatherapy every single day if nothing else. It’s funny, I take that shit to work and sometimes I feel like I am pedaling drugs because I offer to share my aromatherapy with co-workers who are stressed out. Lately I have been taking aromatherapy and a crystal of some sort to work. And it helps. Oh does it help.

I have also been working with my shadow self to understand what she needs. First I had to free her (see my starsprae intuitive healing arts blog for more about my day to day healing work). Now I am working with her to help her find her voice again. Lots of years of suppression has not worn well on her. She is wild and free, full of inspiration and amazing life. I have seen glimmers, we are working to make it easy for her to be seen. A morning routine of a tarot reading has been part of my healing process for about a month or so now. I love tarot! It is fun and intuitive and it is helping me stay focused.

The hardest work I have had to do recently is in the area of romantic relationships. I think Nick’s death has influenced this quite a bit if I am completely honest. Since he died I have been mourning the loss of so much- the potential of a healthy father for my older children, the only other parent to Oscar (all of those memories that Nick was the only other person who was apart of!- now I am the only bearer of them), the potential for healing our relationship- I would have liked to be friends with Nick again. The feelings are complicated and deep. It will take quite a long time to get through them. Years and years. All of this has made it harder to tolerate relationships in general, let alone the romantic relationship with my youngest’s father that I have been trying to heal. I gave myself permission to set a healthy boundary with him a couple of weeks ago. I could hear Nick’s voice in my head- “The timing, Jessica, the timing! You always have the worst timing!” Yes, just a couple weeks before Christmas and I set a strong friendship-only boundary. I cannot try for anything else right now. I need space.

Space to remember. Space to be the mother to my children that I feel I need to be. Space to grow my talents as an energy healer. Space to make my own home. Space to spread out. Mostly space to remember. So much remembering lately. I love my psychologist. At our last session she encouraged me with this idea, “You are ready when you are ready.” This applies to so many different things! I am ready to remember. I am ready to let myself go to those spaces. I am ready to stand up for my needs. I am ready to forgive (even though that is going to take me a long time to do completely, Nick!) I am ready to live as who I am.

I cannot believe we have to do Christmas this year without you, Nick. I do wish you were here to spoil the kids and share your jolly Christmas spirit with them. It was the one time of year that you always made into the best for us, for them. I know you tried so so hard.

Oscar, there was a three pound Hershey chocolate bar at Walmart this year! I would have bought it for you if you were still alive, no doubt! I miss you so so much. You would have been on your first winter break from college. I wonder what you would have been studying? You would be here with us. On the pull out sofa. Ready to splash and play and have fun with your brothers and sister. You were always my mother hen. Taking care of everybody. I wish I could have done better teaching you to take care of yourself. I know you are still here with us, I feel you here with me right now, but that doesn’t change how much I miss you.

Christmas sucks as much as it is wonderful when you are a bereaved mama and divorced widow.

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